How we interview at Gemography

Gemography enables top software engineers to join remotely fast-growing tech companies (based in Silicon Valley, New York and Paris).

To join our network, you'll have first to complete a 3-5 steps screening process.

1. Technical Quiz (20-min)

The first step of the screening process is a technical quiz. You can complete it online (anytime) and it's all multi-choice questions.

The questions aren't meant to test your memory. For example we won't ask about the syntax for a specific git command, instead we'll ask you about the best use case for a certain git command.

You'll also have the option to pick the quiz that best fits your preferences and job role. There are quizzes for Frontend, Backend, Data Engineering and more ...

On average, to complete the quiz, you'll need 10 to 20 minutes of solid focus time. Plan accordingly.

2. Technical Interview (60-min)

If you successfully pass the technical quiz, you'll be immediately invited to schedule a 1-hour technical interview with one of our software engineers.

The interview is conducted online (via Zoom) and covers questions around the projects you've worked on in the past, technical challenges you've solved and how, as well as deep dive questions around frameworks & technologies you're experienced with.

You'll have the option to pass the interview in the language of your choice (French or English). You'll also have the option the pick the time-slot that works best for you (using Calendly).

3. Culture-fit Interview (60-min)

If you successfully pass the technical interview, you'll be invited immediately to pass a 1-hour culture-fit interview with one of our People Ops specialists.

The interview is conducted online (via Zoom) and covers questions around your collaboration and communication skills as well as your career goals, your preferred work style, or how you dealt with certain events in your past professional experiences.

You'll have the option to pass the interview in the language of your choice (French or English). You'll also have the option the pick the time-slot that works best for you (using Calendly).

What we look for

These traits are not all we look for, nor all we care about. But here are some of the things that interviewers base their decisions on:

Passion for building software: A common denominator between all great developers is their obsession with staying at the top of their craft and making sure they are continuously honing their skills and improving and learning all the times. This could mean having a history of working on side projects, contributing to open source, reading technical blog posts ... and more.

Knowledge of best practices: regardless of which framework or programming language you’re familiar with, a lot of the questions will center not on how to achieve certain trivial things (you can always google that), instead we’re curious about the best practices you know, the conventions you’re familiar with and how you leverage them as well as the anti-patterns you always try to avoid when writing software.

Communication: it’s one of those things that is very important but often overlooked. By communication we don’t just mean proficiency in this or that language, although that’s important.

What’s even more important is the ability to explain fairly complex ideas in a simple way without forcing the person in front of you to ask too many follow up questions to clarify.

The lack of this strength alone is possibly the biggest roadblock to making distributed teams function properly and that’s why interviewers will pay a lot of attention to it.

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